The Game Gourmet Adam Starchild

ISBN: 9781410108906

Published: July 1st 2005

Paperback

240 pages


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The Game Gourmet  by  Adam Starchild

The Game Gourmet by Adam Starchild
July 1st 2005 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, RTF | 240 pages | ISBN: 9781410108906 | 5.12 Mb

Wild animals, which are constantly on the move and never feed under artificial conditions, have meat with a higher ratio of protein to fat than that of domestic animals- for example, while you may see venison with some distinct fat layering, you willMoreWild animals, which are constantly on the move and never feed under artificial conditions, have meat with a higher ratio of protein to fat than that of domestic animals- for example, while you may see venison with some distinct fat layering, you will never see it marbled with fat.

And, while it is not inconceivable that some wild animals may ingest toxic substances, such as residual pesticides that might have drifted into their feeding area, we can at least say with some certainty that they have not been fed chemicals for water (i.e., weight) retention or to start the tenderization process while still on the hoof, or hormones for quick growth, etc. In other words, we can be reasonably sure that the meat from wild animals as nearly approaches purity as is possible in a society where contamination--even radioactive fallout--is pervasive.

Apart from the favorable ratio of protein to fat in the meat of game animals, it also contains certain necessary minerals, in fairly generous amounts. All the red meats are good sources of phosphorus and iron (but not of calcium). Of the fifteen different minerals required for human nutrition, most game meat (notably venison) contains sodium potassium and magnesium, as well as traces of calcium, cobalt, zinc, manganese and aluminum. The cook should understand that the meat from all species of wild animals does not taste the same. Some animals, such as deer, caribou, elk and moose, are somewhat similar to beef in their taste, texture and cooking requirements.

Others, such as beaver and bear, are somewhat similar to pork. The flavor of game meat can even vary within a species, depending upon the age of the animals, the type of diet it lived on, and--to perhaps belabor a point--how it was handled after being killed. Look upon this book as a sort of how-to book, rather than just a cookbook, because in it we will be passing along tips which should make your next hunting trip more pleasant, and your next experience in cooking and eating game meat as pleasurable as it should be.



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