Barnabas, Hermas and the Didache - Being the Donnellan Lectures Delivered Before the University of Dublin 1920 J. Armitage Robinson

ISBN: 9781406718492

Published: October 1st 2007

Paperback

132 pages


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Barnabas, Hermas and the Didache - Being the Donnellan Lectures Delivered Before the University of Dublin 1920  by  J. Armitage Robinson

Barnabas, Hermas and the Didache - Being the Donnellan Lectures Delivered Before the University of Dublin 1920 by J. Armitage Robinson
October 1st 2007 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, RTF | 132 pages | ISBN: 9781406718492 | 4.28 Mb

PREFACE ultimate aim of these Lectures is to reach a point of view from which the literary character and the historical value of the Uidache, or Teaching of the Apostles, can be justly estimated. The study of the Epistle attributed to the ApostleMorePREFACE ultimate aim of these Lectures is to reach a point of view from which the literary character and the historical value of the Uidache, or Teaching of the Apostles, can be justly estimated. The study of the Epistle attributed to the Apostle Barnabas goes to show that its closing section, which treats of the quotTwo Ways, quot is wholly in character with the rest of the Epistle and is almost certainly the original composition of this rabbinically-minded author.

The study of the Shepherd will suggest that quot in the form in which Hermas knew the quotTwo Ways it is found in the Epistle of Barnabas. The Didache in its opening section offers us the quotTwo Waysquot of the Epistle of Barnabas with an improved arrange ment of its precepts and with modifications intro duced from the Shepherd of Hermas as well as from the Sermon on the Mount. Moreover the closing section of the Didache has borrowed from the earlier part of the Epistle of Barnabas. The use of Barnabas and Hermas was recognised at once by Bryennius the first editor of the Didache in 1883, and by Dr Harnack in his notable edition of 188 1 and it was allowed that for this reason the Didache could not be placed earlier than c.

140-160. But the question of date was obscured by a theory propounded two years later by Dr C. Taylor, who was impressed by the rabbinic cast of much of the Didache and accordingly suggested that the earlier part of it, at any rate, was a Jewish manual of instructions for proselytes which had been embodied with various modifications in the Epistle of Barnabas and in the Didache.

The references to the Sermon on the Mount and to the Shepherd of Hernias were disposed of by the assumption that the chapter ofthe Didache in which they occurred was a Christian inter polation, introduced to make this Jewish manual more suitable for candidates for Holy Baptism. As the interpolation might have been made, not by the author of the Didache himself, but by a later reviser of it, neither Barnabas nor Hernias need any longer be taken into account in fixing the date of the book in its uninterpolated form. Some critics were there fore courageous enough to assign it to the first century, though Dr Harnack, who accepted the new theory, still refused to go back behind the time of Hadrian.

If what is urged in these Lectures is accepted, thn theory of a Jewish manual disappears altogether, and the ground is cleared for a new consideration of the whole problem. Eight years ago I suggested that the aim of the writer of the Didache was to be gathered from the title which he himself prefixed to his work quotThe Teaching of the Lord, through the Twelve Apostles, to the Gentiles.quot In other words, he was endeavouring to present a picture of the way in which the Gentile Churches were ordered by their Apostolic founders, and he sought to confine himself, so far as he could, to such precepts and regulations as could be authenticated, directly or indirectly, by writings of the Apostolic age.

In the essay which dealt with this matter, and which I have reprinted here as Appendix A, only the second portion of the Didache came under investigation for when it was written I still held the almost universally accepted Two Ways, and there theory of an original Jewish fore did not attempt to apply the same principle of interpretation to the first portion of the book...



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